Av. de Chateleine 7
Architecture d’intérieur
PIERRE-ALEXANDRE MATEOS, CHARLES TEYSSOU, AND OCTAVE PERRAULT
CRUSING PAVILION:THE ARCHITECTURE OF GAY AND DISSIDENT SEXUALITIES

Fall 2021

Cruising Pavilion is a course dedicated to the history of different LGBTQI+ sexual encounter areas, following the eponymous exhibition project presented in Venice, New York and Stockholm. Whether they are appropriate (parks, toilets, car parks, etc.) or dedicated (sex clubs, saunas, chat rooms, dating applications, etc.), the evolution of these places traces the history of dissident sexualities from their clandestinity to their emancipation. The aim is to analyze their spatial constructions and their influence on the history of forms from the 20th century to the present day. This course will present architectural case studies and artistic projects related to this counterculture. Cruising will be presented as an act of politicization of the city, a site of invention and sexual affirmation and a laboratory for the avant-garde.

The aim of this course is to lay the foundations for a book on the architecture of cruising entitled Cruising Pavilion, an Architectural Reader. From a typology of appropriate and dedicated meeting places, we will identify the main spatial installations invented by these sexual countercultures. Architectural plans, accounts, ephemera, design prototypes and urban interventions will be part of the materials used to trace the history of this practice. Alongside this, the course will trace the influence of cruising in art, film and literature. Some of the contributions produced as a result of the course will be included in the publication project planned for 2022

LEONID SLONIMSKIY / KOSMOS / ASSISTANT B. VAN DORP
RE: WORK!

Spring 2021

Facing a constantly transforming world, especially within the hallmark of our modern life – work and the workplace, this studio seeks to re-imagine the oftentimes sad and even depressive spaces associated to the ubiquitous condition of work loss: unemployment centers and vacation homes for the unemployed. Centered around the idea of rebirth, the studio challenges students to draw from existing resources (abandoned buildings, unused materials) to renew work (unemployment center in combination with diagnostics center, job fair, co-working, startup incubator, learning center, makers space) and life (temporary living structures in remote areas for people to recharge while looking for new jobs).

The studio combines design with research where students will investigate the future of work and smart reuse of materials to derive appropriate programs and design strategies. Students will work both collectively (unemployment center) and individually (vacation house). Site visits, lectures series, and guest juries with experts in the field of future scenario research, architectural renovation and material recycling will accompany students through this discovery journey.

CHARLES HELLER
SOCIO-POLITICAL PRACTICES IN ARCHITECTURE

Spring 2021

The class “Socio-Political practices in architecture” introduces students to key spatial concepts that offer points of entry into contemporary transformations of space and spatial practices across multiple scales – from the planetary to the intimate – and into their social, political or ideological dimensions. The course is structured as an exploration of spatial ontologies – the different spatial categories and objects that make up our world – and their interrelations. This will lead us from concepts of space, place, and territories to those of the body and affect, but also networks and infrastructures, objects and matter.

 

Students will be introduced to symmetrical ontological approaches according to which humans and non-humans exist on a continuum, enter complex assemblages and all possess a capacity to change the world. At the same time, we will analyse the way these spatial categories are shaped by multiple lines of conflict, including between capital and labour, migration and borders, race and gender relations.

BAS PRINCEN
WITHOUT LIGHTS (UNBELEUCHTET) – VISUALIZING THE CITY LANDSCAPE

Spring 2021

This course stems from a romantic idea of the city where there exist unoccupied spaces that could be one’s haven. It seeks to analyze such hidden and oftentimes unlit spaces and represent them in radical ways through a wide range of mediums. The process of architectural design starts with the act of seeing and observing whose end result does not stop with the built structure. Each architectural project comes to life the second time through documentation and visualization. In this studio, we treat architectural documentation as a design project in and of itself by going through a rigorous process.

First, students are asked to identify “unlit” spaces in the city, investigating why and how they are hidden from view. Second, they would develop a strategy to “capture” these spaces, whether with long exposure photography, film, or 3D scan. Finally, they would reproduce these “captured images” on a new medium, to transform what has been observed and documented into a new “image or object”, either a photographic print in a certain size or installation or even a scaled down 3D printed copy.

DR. PHILIPPE RAHM
NATURAL HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE

Spring 2021

An ecological, objective, materialist, environmental, and realist approach to urban, architecture and interior design history

The course is an ex cathedra course presenting the history of architecture, interior decoration, and urban planning, followed by conversations on the contemporary consequences of the topics covered in the lectures, which will also be based on the design projects elaborated by the students. The History of Architecture written these last decades was dominated by critical thinking and post-modern theories of the second half of the 20th century. The causes and consequences of the emergence of a form, a style, or a language were attributed to political, social, economic, and cultural reasons.

Induced by a context of massive and easy access to energy as well as the progress of medicine, this History that precedes us can be described as cultural. It has, in fact, largely ignored the physical, geographical, climatic, or bacteriological reasons that have shaped the architectural form of buildings, in a decisive way, over centuries, from cities to interior decoration. Our objective or realistic History of Architecture course will highlight the natural, physical, biological, and climatic causes that have influenced the development of architectural history and its figures, from prehistory until today, in order to understand how to face the major environmental challenges of our century and build in a better way in response to climate urgency.

VERA SACCHETTI
MA THESIS: PERSPECTIVES ON HERITAGE

Fall 2020

*This course is offered Fall Semester, 2020

The MA Thesis: Perspectives on Heritage course offers a parallel track. On the one hand, it opens up perspectives on the students’ thesis topics via the voices of several guest lecturers, who throughout the semester bring in varied perspectives around the themes of media and heritage.

On the other hand, it follows and supports students during the making of their masters’ thesis, offering clear guidelines and objectives as they develop the theoretical milestone of their diploma.

LILET BREDDELS and ARJEN OOSTERMAN
THE LEGACY

Fall  2020

The course centers around the idea of legacy in the world of architecture and design. On the one hand, the creative production process is fed by the historical experience of the profession (accumulated/incremental expertise) and the inspiration from the work of predecessors: designs and built projects. On the other hand, a current day practitioner must consider what his/her design will contribute to the world.

No matter how commercial one’s future practice will be, this is a reality check that has become inescapable. Thus, “The legacy” challenges students to reflect on their own critical position towards their future practice as well as exploring what legacy means to practitioners who focus on heritage. With a teaching format that combines theoretical classes and writing exercises, students will acquire skills in research, writing, positioning, and interviewing.

LILET BREDDELS and ARJEN OOSTERMAN
CURATING ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2020

This course accompanies the design studio program. Through a combination of lectures, readings, discussions, and hands-on exercises, it provides students with an understanding of the different means to disseminate architecture as well as the necessary skills to represent their own or others’ works or ideas. First, students study a wide range of formats – exhibitions, biennials, design weeks, festivals, debates, (online) magazines, books – as containers for thoughts.

Then, they will practice interviewing, writing and editing texts for blogposts and press releases, making info graphics, and creating a portfolio. By the end of the course, students will have adopted skills in communication, transcription, and mastered in choices of dissemination formats.

FALA STUDIO, assisted by CAMILLE BAGNOU
FLOATING POINTS

Fall 2020

While contemporary domestic architecture is characterized by a supremely dry and neutral palette of interiors, and public buildings are bunker-like objects turning their back on the public realm, this studio challenges these modest strategies by exploring and reinventing new typologies that could blur the boundaries between the public and domestic, the interior and exterior, the old and new.

Inspired by the limited mobility of our time, the studio offers a return to the region’s mythical lakeshore to rediscover its hidden treasures and unknown architectural heritage that could give rise to new public programs. This process consists of two phases. First, by using photography and comprehensive drawings, we will survey the shoreline together with its various existing architectural conditions and their qualities. Then, we will define spatial strategies and constructive details to conceive buildings that could enable the coexistence of seemingly opposite categories as mentioned above.

JAVIER CONTRERAS and YOURI KRATCHENKO, assisted by MANON POTERA
HEBARIUM OF INTERIORS

Fall 2019 and Fall 2020

MAIA’s first semester studio is a unique collaboration between India Mahdavi and HEAD-Genève. Reflecting on the concept of « herbarium » as understood within interior architecture – spaces whose image oscillates between content and representation, we propose to revisit a diverse collection of timeless interior spaces and typologies that marked their time but now remain only through photography, from Le Palace club, the Playboy apartment, to XX bank. Updated as a magnificent Herbarium of Interiors in Milan, these spaces replicate not their original images but their mythologies, experiences, and associated cultures.

Few formats define more accurately the relationship between presence and obliteration than the herbarium. Deprived of life, herbarium specimens acquire a new condition in their timelessness: they exist only in the space of representation, simultaneously as the content and result of depiction.

These objects become their own image. Along the same line, India Mahdavi’s 2014 temporary restaurant, The Gallery at Sketch in London, has become the most circulated and shared space in the history of images.

This is the hypothesis that defines us today: to rewrite the history of interior architecture through interior architecture; to understand that certain mythical scenes have not only been witnesses of an era but also become the preachers of future times — mythical places of cultural productions or social incubators which are capable of drawing and redrawing the frame of time.

KAI REAVER
ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE AND DIGITAL MEDIA: THEORY AND EXPERIMENTATION

Fall 2020

This applied theory course involves in-class lectures and discussions as well as technical, prototype-oriented workshops, where students get to explore unknown and speculative areas within the field of architectural heritage in relation to contemporary digital media. The course seeks to familiarize students with both disciplines through important literature and individual heritage conservation cases that have shaped the former, and emerging trends within the later as well as their impact on the built environment.

The outcome of the course is multifold. On the one hand, students will obtain a general understanding of architectural heritage and be able to perform case study work on individual building or site of historical significance to deploy a range of arguments and interpretations of heritage strategies upon such building or site. On the other hand, through hands-on experimental technical prototype construction and documentation exercises, they will develop competence in conducting experimental prototype work as a rigorous research method.